Wild Moth
Wild Moth

The Bottom of the Hill was still, and admittedly empty as the evening began to take place. Tonight’s performances would include acts both new and old, as musical veterans and newcomers came together under the musical booking force that is Noise Pop.

Chicago’s Bottomless Pit would be the main attraction; featuring former members of Silkworm and Seam, it felt right to assume that tonight’s performers would feature musicians who have their fair share of tour stories.

Joining Bottomless Pit would be Seattle’s Kinski and local San Francisco acts Vir, and Wild Moth. Each band carrying that kind of post-punk dissonance, the lineup felt solid, as each group musically complimented one another.

First to perform was San Francisco’s Wild Moth, who unfortunately had to face a slightly empty room. Maybe it’s because Wild Moth were by far the youngest band on the lineup, or maybe it was just because they carried the weight as the opener, it truly disheartening to see such an empty room.

Vir
Vir

However, despite the lack of audience Wild Moth proved themselves by delivering a performance that was fully committed. A sound that is angst riddled and sometimes sludgy, Wild Moth makes the kind of music for the disenchanted twenty-somethings that are desperately trying to feel all right (in the best way).

Next on the bill was San Francisco’s Vir whose equal parts post-punk and shoe gaze sound features an abrasive bassline.

In between songs guitarist Sam Sloane took a moment to dedicate a song to musician and comedian Bill Hicks, and as a result may have performed their most engaging song.

Kinski
Kinski

Finally, Seattle’s Kinski took the stage. By now, the room had begun to fill up and a few audience members in the front exhibited a truly healthy amount of enthusiasm for the group. The music of Kinski is instrumental for the most part, and often times the band members faced away from the crowd as they trudged through their set.  However, at one point a flute made an appearance and the hardcore fans in the front cheered.

By the time Bottomless Pit made their way to the stage, Bottom of the Hill had begun to filter out once more. However, long time fans moved toward the front and fully committed themselves with the band––even asking for an encore after the set, which Bottomless dutifully delivered.

Bottomless Pit
Bottomless Pit

Notable about the show was the love and support the bands that performed had for Bottom of the Hill as a venue. On multiple occasions a member would take a moment to express how much they appreciate a local music venue like the Bottom of the Hill.

In terms of a week long event like Noise Pop, which is meant to celebrate local and non local music, it’s nice to see musicians take a moment to express support for venues like Bottom of the Hill that have been supporters of live music for decades now. Arguably, one of San Francisco’s most historical venues, a show at Bottom of the Hill is never a disappointment.

Tags: , , , ,